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Probiotics and Intense Exercise Part 2: Close to the Finishing Line

 

As well as ensuring all of our products are made to the highest manufacturing standards, it is also important to us to be at the front of the latest research and knowledge of different supplements. Our Proven Probiotics range has previously been used in UK studies performed in Cambridge and Sheffield have shown that 2 capsules (25 billion) of Adult Acidophilus and Bifidus Lab4 probiotics can provide real benefits in supporting digestive and immune health.

As part of a new series of studies, we are also now beginning research to see what effect Proven Probiotics can have on gastrointestinal health in individuals who take part in regular intense exercise. Our PhD student, Jamie Pugh, has already spent 2 years at Liverpool John Moores University, and has been performing studies looking at the effects intense exercise can have on our digestive system, what symptoms these may cause, and has even started to catalogue how prevalent these symptoms may be in elite sport. In the latest study, Jamie will be looking to see if Proven Probiotics can help reduce symptoms, and gut damage in marathon runners. Jamie Pugh updates us with his study...

 

“It is a very busy and exciting time for me at the moment. The intense exercise study is coming to an end and I am starting to analyse all of the samples from the trials. At the same time, we have just finished collecting data to try and see how elite athletes are effected by gut issues, as well as in recreational marathon runners. It is in marathon runners that the most research has probably been carried out over the last few decades. We know that many will suffer from some form of gastrointestinal symptom during a race, even if they are only mild. But, at the extreme end, there have also been cases as runners having to withdraw from races because of digestive issues. This is one of the reasons why we have set out to see if probiotics might be an easy way to help reduce symptoms, and reduce the damage to the gut that extreme exercise can cause.

This summer, we will be asking some budding volunteers to not only run a full marathon (26.2 miles), but also do this round a 400m athletics track. That’s 105, and a bit, laps. The reason why we doing it like this, is because we can make sure our research team is there for every runner, every step of the way. It will be the first time that a marathon has been studied like this. We will be able to accurately record any gut symptom, all food and drink that each runner consumes, and even look to see how their pace is effected as we will have a time split for every lap. We will also be able to take all blood samples immediately before and after the race.
Before the marathon, we will split our participant into two groups. One will consume a probiotic, and the other will consume a placebo that looks identical, for 4 weeks before the race. Neither us, nor the participants will know who is taking what pill until all of the results have been analysed. We will also asking everyone to complete a training and symptom diary to see if the probiotics effect everyday symptoms.
The marathon will be taking place on August 20th and, at the time of writing, I am still looking for willing volunteers. If you are interested, please email me at j.pugh@2014.ljmu.ac.uk."

 

As soon as the results are in, we will let you know, as well as the results from the Intense Exercise study.